Friday, December 18, 2009

Jacob's Foot: 'Because You Left' Audio Commentary Thoughts (Part ofMassive Season Six Preview)

LOST: The Complete Fifth Season

The Journey Back-Expanded Edition

One of Many Reviews: Audio Commentary for "Because You Left."

I know I promised the season two would be up next; however, what I declined to mention is that only pertained to the next season I'll write too many words about. Anywho, it's time to give my thoughts on the commentary Damon Lindelof and Carlton Cuse recorded for the fifth season premiere "Because You Left."

--This is an epic, detailed commentary. They discuss the major points of Season Five, how they got there. In sum, they summarize the entire writing process of the fifth season from mini-camp to the finale.

--With that said, they let slip a few things about the final season. It's barely anything but it's enough that I can write many words about it. The first thing I'll mention is their use of the word paradox when discussing what Faraday will attempt to do by season's end. The reason why the word struck me is because, since they recorded the season three podcast for Flashes Before Your Eyes, they've advocated the no paradox rule. I'm sure I've written about this using different words and phrasing months ago but I'm ready to advocate 'time will not reboot' during the final season full time. I'm open to anything that actually happens. But yes: paradox absolutely stood out to me.

--Damon quips about the teaser of the episode, saying "Because You Left" begins as the other seasons doe: not knowing where the hell you are or you are with. I got a kick out of that.

--Desmond is discussed. The Desmond discussion takes place at the end of the episode (you know...when Desmond appears) and Lindelof and Cuse jump ahead to what Ms. Hawking tells him: The Island is not done with him. Apparently, The Island is not done with Desmond at all. The discussion is very interesting not because they say a certain character's story is not done, it's HOW they discuss it. They used words like significance as in the viewers will learn Desmond's significance to the WHOLE story. But it is the final season. We're going to learn about where every character fits in to the grand scheme of things. In the recap before 'The Incident' aired in May, Damon and Carlton give a brief summary of where the characters were left at the end of "Follow The Leader" and then say that they are really excited to be at this point where they can begin really telling the final chapter of how these characters are more intertwined than they ever imagiend. Oh man I can't wait.

-I really enjoyed the discussion about how season five was constructed and crafted, even the first episode alone. Damon and Carlton discussed the mistakes they made in past finales (not involving all of the characters) and how they wanted to account for every character in the premiere. They discussed how to pay each character the time they needed in a 42 minute window. The discussion provides valuable insight into the inner-workings of the LOST writers room and how an episode is broken (the most famous episode break is for "The Constant").

-During the scene in which Locke is treated by Richard for his bullet wound, Damon and Carlton talk about how (the viewer now knows) Future Locke and Ben are watching the scene from the jungle. Carlton simply says 'Locke is basically a different person" and Damon then says "You can say that again!" Oh those wacky dudes. Should I have written Future Locke or Not Locke there? Hm. They have a lot of fun messing with the audience. Speaking of that, there's a worthwhile quote from Damon from a GQ interview with Bad Robot. It's about the final season. Suffice to say, I will be using this quote again when I write the final part of this preview on February 1, 2010.

But it makes you understand why some people go to church every Sunday and some people are atheists. Some people need Lost to have a scientific explanation for everything, and that's why our viewership now is what it is—because the people who needed there to be a scientific explanation for everything stopped watching. They were like, "Okay—the show has now proven my theory wrong." This is another joke masking a true terror for us—we're doing the last season of the show now, and this season is where you get your answers. And we're not waiting until the last episode—the answers start coming fairly fast and furious right out of the gate. But in a lot of ways, the storytelling this year is just us telling people that they were wrong. They've built up theories for five years. When a show like this gets to a certain point and then it's "Oh, man, we were cancelled," people get to bring their theories with them to the grave. With us, it's basically like, "No—you're wrong." And some people may have been right. Who knows?

-Back to the commentary: they spend some time emphasizing thee motif of the season which is The Hatch. They wanted to set up the importance of the Hatch again because they knew that would be the key thing by season's end. They wanted to establish the rules of time-travel because they wanted the viewers to question whether or not the characters would try to change anything. This led into a discussion about the overall story of the show and how free-will is a very important theme. Eventually, the characters do try to change things and those episodes are really, really good.

-There could be a part two to this because I might be leaving things out. But this is the end of this LOST entry.
LOST: The Complete Fifth Season

The Journey Back-Expanded Edition

One of Many Reviews: Audio Commentary for "Because You Left."


I know I promised the season two would be up next; however, what I declined to mention is that only pertained to the next season I'll write too many words about. Anywho, it's time to give my thoughts on the commentary Damon Lindelof and Carlton Cuse recorded for the fifth season premiere "Because You Left."

--This is an epic, detailed commentary. They discuss the major points of Season Five, how they got there. In sum, they summarize the entire writing process of the fifth season from mini-camp to the finale.

--With that said, they let slip a few things about the final season. It's barely anything but it's enough that I can write many words about it. The first thing I'll mention is their use of the word paradox when discussing what Faraday will attempt to do by season's end. The reason why the word struck me is because, since they recorded the season three podcast for Flashes Before Your Eyes, they've advocated the no paradox rule. I'm sure I've written about this using different words and phrasing months ago but I'm ready to advocate 'time will not reboot' during the final season full time. I'm open to anything that actually happens. But yes: paradox absolutely stood out to me.

--Damon quips about the teaser of the episode, saying "Because You Left" begins as the other seasons doe: not knowing where the hell you are or you are with. I got a kick out of that.

--Desmond is discussed. The Desmond discussion takes place at the end of the episode (you know...when Desmond appears) and Lindelof and Cuse jump ahead to what Ms. Hawking tells him: The Island is not done with him. Apparently, The Island is not done with Desmond at all. The discussion is very interesting not because they say a certain character's story is not done, it's HOW they discuss it. They used words like significance as in the viewers will learn Desmond's significance to the WHOLE story. But it is the final season. We're going to learn about where every character fits in to the grand scheme of things. In the recap before 'The Incident' aired in May, Damon and Carlton give a brief summary of where the characters were left at the end of "Follow The Leader" and then say that they are really excited to be at this point where they can begin really telling the final chapter of how these characters are more intertwined than they ever imagiend. Oh man I can't wait.

-I really enjoyed the discussion about how season five was constructed and crafted, even the first episode alone. Damon and Carlton discussed the mistakes they made in past finales (not involving all of the characters) and how they wanted to account for every character in the premiere. They discussed how to pay each character the time they needed in a 42 minute window. The discussion provides valuable insight into the inner-workings of the LOST writers room and how an episode is broken (the most famous episode break is for "The Constant").

-During the scene in which Locke is treated by Richard for his bullet wound, Damon and Carlton talk about how (the viewer now knows) Future Locke and Ben are watching the scene from the jungle. Carlton simply says 'Locke is basically a different person" and Damon then says "You can say that again!" Oh those wacky dudes. Should I have written Future Locke or Not Locke there? Hm. They have a lot of fun messing with the audience. Speaking of that, there's a worthwhile quote from Damon from a GQ interview with Bad Robot. It's about the final season. Suffice to say, I will be using this quote again when I write the final part of this preview on February 1, 2010.
But it makes you understand why some people go to church every Sunday and some people are atheists. Some people need Lost to have a scientific explanation for everything, and that's why our viewership now is what it is—because the people who needed there to be a scientific explanation for everything stopped watching. They were like, "Okay—the show has now proven my theory wrong." This is another joke masking a true terror for us—we're doing the last season of the show now, and this season is where you get your answers. And we're not waiting until the last episode—the answers start coming fairly fast and furious right out of the gate. But in a lot of ways, the storytelling this year is just us telling people that they were wrong. They've built up theories for five years. When a show like this gets to a certain point and then it's "Oh, man, we were cancelled," people get to bring their theories with them to the grave. With us, it's basically like, "No—you're wrong." And some people may have been right. Who knows?

-Back to the commentary: they spend some time emphasizing thee motif of the season which is The Hatch. They wanted to set up the importance of the Hatch again because they knew that would be the key thing by season's end. They wanted to establish the rules of time-travel because they wanted the viewers to question whether or not the characters would try to change anything. This led into a discussion about the overall story of the show and how free-will is a very important theme. Eventually, the characters do try to change things and those episodes are really, really good.

-There could be a part two to this because I might be leaving things out. But this is the end of this LOST entry.

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About The Foot

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Originally, I titled the blog Jacob's Foot after the giant foot that Jacob inhabited in LOST. That ended. It became TV With The Foot in 2010. I wrote about a lot of TV.